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HTTP/2 Smarter At Scale

Much of the web today runs on HTTP/1.1. The spec for HTTP/1.1 was published in June of 1999, just shy of 20 years ago. A lot has changed since then, which makes it all the more remarkable that HTTP/1.1 has persisted and flourished for so long. But in some areas it’s beginning to show its age; for the most part, in that the designers weren’t building for the scale at which HTTP/1.1 would be used and the astonishing amount of traffic that it would come to handle. A not-so-bad case is that subsequent tests can’t pass because of a leaked resource from the previous test. The worst case is that some subsequent tests pass that wouldn’t have passed at all if the previously passed test had not leaked a resource.


Gracefully clean up in gRPC JUnit tests

It is best practice to always clean up gRPC resources such as client channels, servers, and previously attached Contexts whenever they are no longer needed.

This is even true for JUnit tests, because otherwise leaked resources may not only linger in your machine forever, but also interfere with subsequent tests. A not-so-bad case is that subsequent tests can’t pass because of a leaked resource from the previous test. The worst case is that some subsequent tests pass that wouldn’t have passed at all if the previously passed test had not leaked a resource.


gRPC ❤ Kotlin

Did you know that gRPC Java now has out of box support for Kotlin projects built with Gradle? Kotlin is a modern, statically typed language developed by JetBrains that targets the JVM and Android. It is generally easy for Kotlin programs to interoperate with existing Java libraries. To improve this experience further, we have added support to the protobuf-gradle-plugin so that the generated Java libraries are automatically picked up by Kotlin. You can now add the protobuf-gradle-plugin to your Kotlin project, and use gRPC just like you would with a typical Java project.


So You Want to Optimize gRPC - Part 2

How fast is gRPC? Pretty fast if you understand how modern clients and servers are built. In part 1, I showed how to get an easy 60% improvement. In this post I show how to get a 10000% improvement.